EMPH has Oomph: Impact Factor Approved

EMPH has Oomph: Impact Factor Approved

Approval of an impact factor has just been announced for Evolution Medicine and Public Heath, the Open Access journal published by the Oxford University Press for the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health. This is a major accomplishment for such a new journal, started by Stephen Stearns just 7 years ago. The specific impact factor will be announced this summer.

Submit your articles now. Or send a note to the editor, Charles Nunn, inquiring about a possible submission. ISEMPH members get a $1,000 discount on author’s fees

As in previous years, the $5,000 George C. Williams prize is awarded to the best paper in the journal each year.

If you’re not already registered for them, you can get “Email Alerts” for EMPH articles. ISEMPH is working with OUP to create a system that sends notifications only when the final pdf version of an article is posted. In the meanwhile, you can create or sign into your free OUP account to specify which of four possible kinds of alerts you want to receive.

New Issue Alerts are sent just after a journal issue closes. Since EMPH is organized in annual volumes, this e-alert is sent only once per year for EMPH.

 In Progress Alerts are sent either daily or weekly and contain any new content that has posted since the prior e-alert. Since EMPH only places corrected proofs in issues, this would probably be the best alert type for most ISEMPH members.

Advance Article Alerts are also sent either daily or weekly and contain any new content that has posted since the prior e-alert. (Again, the user gets to select the frequency.) Only accepted manuscripts are placed here. This will get you a notification of all new content as soon as it publishes.

Article Activity Alerts can be created by each user, if they would like to be notified about any subsequent activity related to a specific manuscript – comments, errata, etc. This is different than Saved Searches, which can also be created by users.

Zoobiquity Colorado Oct 4-5

Zoobiquity Colorado Oct 4-5

A very interesting conference Oct 4-5 for those interested in evolution, health and  disease in diverse species.  Full info here. 

Zoobiquity Colorado: Connecting Human and Animal Health through Regenerative Medicine

This conference aims to uncover the astonishing connection between human and animal health by highlighting laboratory and clinical research of human and veterinary investigators and fostering future collaboration across disciplines.

Article by Sarah Myers wins the $5000  George C. Williams award for 2016

Article by Sarah Myers wins the $5000 George C. Williams award for 2016

The International Society for Evolution, Medicine & Public Health has just announced an article by Sara Myers as the winner of the 2017 George C. Williams Prize. Myers, along with her colleagues Oskar Burger and Sarah E. Johns from the University of Kent, Canterbury, are recognized for their paper, “Postnatal depression and reproductive success in modern, low-fertility contexts.” The paper was published in Issue 1, volume 2016 of Evolution, Medicine & Public Health.   EMPH is an open access Oxford University Press Journal sponsored by ISEMPH.  Special offer: Those attending the ISEMPH or ESEB meetings in August in Groningen Netherlands are eligible to submit a paper to the journal without the usual author’s fees. 

The prize committee included Katie Hinde, Ruth Mace and committee chair Andrew Read. The winners will receive a $5,000 prize, courtesy of the generous Doris Williams and other donors, and an invitation to present their paper at the annual meeting of the Society in Groningen in August. Congratulations to Sarah, Oskar and Sarah!

Microbial Darwinian Medicine workshop at Lorentz Center, August 14th to 17th 2017

Microbial Darwinian Medicine workshop at Lorentz Center, August 14th to 17th 2017

Sandra Bream Andersen has just contacted us to let ISEMPH members know that the Lorentz Center in Leiden is hosting a workshop they think might be of interest to many, the full title of which is “Microbial Darwinian Medicine: A Workshop at the Interface of Medicine and Microbial Eco-Evolutionary Biology”. The workshop will be held between August 14th and 17th this year, just prior to the nearby ISEMPH annual meeting in Groningen. The link will take you to registration or allow you to submit an application to participate.

Invitation to contribute to a short survey on applications of evolution for human research

Invitation to contribute to a short survey on applications of evolution for human research

Below is an invitation to contribute to a study on strengths and limitations of human-based research in terms of broader applicability that should take only a few minutes. Please contribute if you can. 

 Dear Participants,
 
Many fundamental concepts in evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology were discovered using non-human systems. Some or many of these concept are also applicable to humans. Here, we have become interested in whether this process can also go the other way around: to which degree can data from humans be relevant to understanding biological fundamentals in these fields? This question has become the core theme of a Proceedings B special issue later this year edited by Erik Postma and Sarah Brosnan.
 
One unknown in this theme is the overall opinion of researchers in biology related fields. For example, to what degree do researchers believe that human studies can be relevant to discover evolutionary fundamentals? Do researchers believe that humans are subject to natural and/or sexual selection? To quantify the opinion of researchers in biology related fields on these and other issues, we have developed a survey. We particularly hope to identify common perceived strengths and limitations of human-based research in terms of broader applicability. 
 
The survey can be found at: https://goo.gl/forms/uV2SkoCQtll9jw9g1
The survey is short and simple and should only take a couple of minutes to complete. The collected data will be published in the Proceedings B special issue. Data remain completely confidential.
 
We hope we can motivate you to participate to the survey. Your opinion and the reasons why are important. We believe this issue is relevant not only to researchers, but also to research councils, funding agencies and, more generally, the public opinion. 
 
 
Thank you very much in advance for your cooperation,
 
Michael Briga and the Lummaa team,
University of Turku, Finland
Image: Through the lens: three-generations of reproduction in historical Finns. What can we learn from studying human populations? Do grandmothers improve grand offspring survival? Does family size affect reproductive success and trait inheritance? Are contemporary humans evolving?