Feed on
Posts
Comments

Category Archive for 'evolutionary medicine'

This past December, science writer David Dobbs published an essay (2013) in the online magazine Aeon (aeon.co/magazine/) that purports to explain why the ‘selfish gene’ concept is outmoded and should be retired.  It elicited a good deal of commentary, and in early March, Aeon published responses (Sapolsky et al., 2014) to the original article from […]

Read Full Post »

Crespi, B., Foster, K., & Úbeda, F. (2014). First principles of Hamiltonian medicine. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 369(1642). doi: 10.1098/rstb.2013.0366 We introduce the field of Hamiltonian medicine, which centres on the roles of genetic relatedness in human health and disease. Hamiltonian medicine represents the application of basic social-evolution theory, for […]

Read Full Post »

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History invites applications for a postdoctoral fellow in Human Health and Evolutionary Medicine within the Division of Collections and Research. The Museum is embarking on its Centennial Transformation Project, which will result in new exhibit galleries and research space.  As part of this project, a new gallery on human health […]

Read Full Post »

 The list of people with an interest in evolution and medicine has been updated by Deryc Painter,  a graduate student in the Center for Biology and Society at ASU.  There are now 446 people on the list. He began with the list from this site of self-identified medical professionals and research academics taking an evolutionary perspective to […]

Read Full Post »

The 46 articles that were nominated  for the 2013 Omenn Prize are listed below.  The $5000 prize, sponsored by The Foundation for Evolution, Medicine, & Public Health, is made possible by a donation from Gilbert Omenn. Nominations closed on February 28, but the prize may be offered again next year.  The winner will be announced […]

Read Full Post »

Geneticists have recognized for some time that many genes exhibit pleiotropy, meaning that one mutation can manifest in two or more distinguishable phenotypic effects. In a fascinating study recently published in Science [2014 Jan 10;343(6167):152-7. doi:10.1126/science.1246886], Joseph et al. offer evidence for an example of pleiotropy in which the distinct phenotypic effects associated with mutation […]

Read Full Post »

The prize is for the best 2013 paper in evolution, medicine, and public health. Deadline, Feb 28.  Details here. 

Read Full Post »

Greaves, Mel. (2014).Was skin cancer a selective force for black pigmentation in early hominin evolution? Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1781). doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.2955  (open access) Melanin provides a crucial filter for solar UV radiation and its genetically determined variation influences both skin pigmentation and risk of cancer. Genetic evidence suggests that the […]

Read Full Post »

          Open Rank (Job# 10655) Arizona State University School of Life Sciences           Center for Evolution, Medicine & Public Health Arizona State University is making a major commitment to developing the field of Evolutionary Medicine. There are plans to recruit up to eight faculty members for a new Center […]

Read Full Post »

Gallium-mediated siderophore quenching as an evolutionarily robust antibacterial treatment Adin Ross-Gillespie, Michael Weigert, Sam P. Brown, and Rolf Kümmerli EMPH Published 30 January 2014, 10.1093/emph/eou003  Background and objectives: Conventional antibiotics select strongly for resistance and are consequently losing efficacy worldwide. Extracellular quenching of shared virulence factors could represent a more promising strategy because (a) it reduces […]

Read Full Post »

A careful reading of the review of fever in “Fever: Friend or Foe?”, reveals the embarrassing deficiency in medical science’s understanding of how fever, much less anorexia, functions in infection. Since fever (as well as anorexia and other components of the acute-phase response) is induced by our own cytokines, it is virtually axiomatic that fever […]

Read Full Post »

Last month, I completed teaching a graduate course for the tenth time.  After several years (in the early 1990’s) of thinking about launching a new alternate-year seminar course and then planning it, I began teaching PATH 480 in the fall of 1994.  The original name of the course, maintained through the first seven times I […]

Read Full Post »

The Evolution, Medicine, & Public Health Foundation invites nominations for the Omenn Prize of $5000 to be awarded in April 2014 for the best  article published in 2013 in any scientific journal on a topic related to evolution in the context of medicine and public health. The prize, provided by the generosity of Gilbert S […]

Read Full Post »

Haig, David. (2014). Interbirth intervals: intrafamilial, intragenomic, and intrasomatic conflict. Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health. doi: 10.1093/emph/eou002   Background and objectives: Interbirth intervals (IBIs) mediate a trade-off between child number and child survival. Life history theory predicts that the evolutionarily optimal IBI differs for different individuals whose fitness is affected by how closely a mother spaces […]

Read Full Post »

Inaugural Lectures and Symposium The ASU Center for Evolution, Medicine & Public Health Streamed live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/asu-live All times are Mountain time (GMT-7) January 17 – 22 The ASU Center for Evolution, Medicine & Public Health (CEMPH) will host several events to celebrate the center’s launch. Directed by Randolph Nesse, a founder of the field of evolutionary […]

Read Full Post »

Book Review by Daniel Promislow of   Evolution & Medicine by Robert L. Perlman Full Text (PDF) Frequency-dependent selection drives HBeAg seroconversion in chronic hepatitis B virus infection By Warner, Abbott and Rodrigo  Abstract         Full Text (PDF)

Read Full Post »

Biomedical scientists and biologists routinely consider how selection shapes the structure and function of proteins of interest.  Less commonly, I suspect, do we consider how selection for attributes other than protein structure and function can favor or disfavor nucleotide sequences that encode particular amino acid sequences.   A new study (Stergachis et al., 2013) published in […]

Read Full Post »

Book Review The story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health & Disease By Daniel Lieberman Publishers: Pantheon Books, Random House, USA  (2013) and Allen Lane (UK) 2013 ISBN: 978-1-846-14393-9  (Amazon link here)  Review by Sir Peter Gluckman, Centre for Human Evolution, Adaptation and Disease, Liggins Institute University of Auckland In recent years there have been a growing number of […]

Read Full Post »

By Monahan-Earley, R., Dvorak, A. M., & Aird, W. C. (2013).  In Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, 11, 46-66. doi: 10.1111/jth.12253  (open access) Summary: Every biological trait requires both a proximate and evolutionary explanation. The field of vascular biology is focused primarily on proximate mechanisms in health and disease. Comparatively little attention has been given to […]

Read Full Post »

Three new papers (Kilpinen et al., 2013; McVickers et al., 2013; Kasowski et al., 2013) published earlier this month in Science all address the effects on human patterns of gene expression and other phenotypes of 1) genetic variation in non-protein coding regions of the genome and 2) covalent modifications of chromatin, the complex of DNA […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »