Sign up now for two great Club EvMed discussions in January

Club EvMed: Integrating evolutionary dynamics into clinical cancer treatment

Monday, January 11th at 12pm EST

Join us for a conversation with Robert Gatenby, Co-Director of the Center of Excellence for Evolutionary Therapy and Chair of the Department of Diagnostic Imaging at the Moffitt Cancer Center. In the talk, Dr. Gatenby will outline basic evolutionary principles and mathematical models used to design clinical therapies with the goal of both control and cure of metastatic cancers. He will summarize the results of the first evolution-based clinical trial in metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Attendees are encouraged to read Zhang et al. 2017 “Integrating evolutionary dynamics into treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer,” Stanková et al. 2019 “Optimizing cancer treatment using game theory,” Gatenby and Brown 2020 “Integrating evolutionary dynamics into cancer therapy,” and Gatenby et al. 2019 “First strike-second strike strategies in metastatic cancer: lessons from the evolutionary dynamics of extinction.”

After the talk, perspectives on how the research applies in a clinical setting will be presented by Shelley Hwang, Mary and Deryl Hart Distinguished Professor of Surgery and Chief of Breast Surgery at Duke. Sign up here for the meeting link: https://duke.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIoc–rrjMpG9Nn2VYkmDZAUQgyQmz339QG.

Club EvMed: Successful Aging in the Forest: How wild chimpanzees can help us understand the evolution of human aging

Thursday, January 28th at 12pm EST

Join us for a conversation with Melissa Emery Thompson, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico. Recent research has revealed that despite shorter life expectancies, humans in small-scale subsistence populations exhibit surprisingly good health, suggesting that some debilitating diseases of aging may be novel products of industrialized environments. This research highlights an urgency to look deeper in our evolutionary past to understand how we age today. I will discuss emerging findings from the first longitudinal study to examine aging in our closest evolutionary relatives, chimpanzees, in their natural environment. Attendees may be interested in reading articles in a recent theme issue on primate agingSign up here for the meeting link: https://duke.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcsfuqhpz0uGtLfw4QojGJWjBK5VnxytrYf.