Gilbert Omenn Prize Accepting Nominations now until March 31

Gilbert Omenn Prize Accepting Nominations now until March 31

Nominations are open now for the 2016 Omenn Prize, to be awarded at the 2017 ISEMPH Meeting in Groningen, Netherlands. The submission deadline is March 31, 2017

The International Society for Evolution, Medicine & Public Health invites nominations for the Omenn Prize of $5000 for the best article published in 2016 in any scientific journal on a topic related to evolution in the context of medicine and public health. It will be awarded in August 2017 at the ISEMPH Meeting in Groningen, Netherlands.
The prize, provided by the generosity of Gilbert S. Omenn, will be awarded to the first author of the winning article.  Authors are encouraged to nominate their own articles, but nominations of articles by others are also welcome.

Nominations close March 31, 2017

Any relevant peer-reviewed article with a publication date of 2016 for the final version of the article is eligible, but the prize is intended for work that uses evolutionary principles to advance understanding of a disease or disease process.  The prize committee will give priority to articles with implications for human health, but many basic science or theoretical articles have such implications.

The Prize Committee for this year is chaired by Grazyna Jasienska, and its members are James Bull and Antonis Rokas.  Papers by committee members, their students and lab group members are not eligible, and articles by their co-authors or close associates are subject to special conditions.  The winner will be invited to present a talk at the  meeting of the International Society for Evolution and Medicine.

Learn more about submitting a nomination.

Hot Topic: Alzheimer’s Disease

Hot Topic: Alzheimer’s Disease

Four essays address the Hot Topic of Alzheimer’s Disease. Please contribute your comments at the end of each essay, or send your own essay to editor@evmedreview.com.

On the 23rd November this year pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly announced that the phase II early-intervention Alzheimer’s disease trial for a monoclonal antibody – solanezumab – designed to remove excess beta-amyloid protein from the brain, had failed. The news has caused another round of hand-wringing and head-scratching in the Alzheimer’s research community because it comes on the back of many trials, costing decades-worth of valuable time and billions of dollars, that has assumed the classical amyloid hypothesis will provide valuable targets for drug intervention. In the light of this recent failure Evmedreview presents a new HOT TOPIC feature of three consecutive posts commenting on this perplexing failure. The first, from Evmedreview associate editor Jeremy Taylor, discusses whether synapse loss is a better indicator of Alzheimer’s disease than amyloid and tau pathology and highlights the role of environmental factors and the immune system in AD etiology. The second, from Caleb Finch, makes the point that environmental factors have been far too overlooked in AD etiology and, in a typical example of blue sky (or should it be grey sky in this case) thinking, is the first article to highlight the role of smoke, smoking and atmospheric pollution. The third commentary, from Robert Moir, is based on his work over the last decade that shows beta-amyloid to be a potent brain-based antimicrobial with obvious repercussions for the caution with which we should approach clearing amyloid out of the brain, and for the possible role of microbial infection as the initial trigger for AD pathology.

The following links demonstrate the extent to which successive drug trial failures have promoted rounds of navel gazing within the AD research community.

http://www.alzforum.org/webinars/resolving-controversies-path-ad-therapeutics-0#Q&A

http://www.alzforum.org/webinars/webinar-can-cellular-phase-unite-disparate-data-alzheimers-pathogenesis

Video links for symposium on implications of anthropogeny for medicine and health

Video links for symposium on implications of anthropogeny for medicine and health

The CARTA Symposium on Implications of Anthropogeny for Medicine and Health, co-sponsored by ASU’s Center for Evolution and Medicine, was held on October 14. See here for Karla Moeller’s excellent account of proceedings. Now Ajit Varki has sent a number of links to different portals for the video recordings of all the talks which were made thanks to UCSD-TV. These video recordings will be archived on these websites in the coming weeks: UCSD-TV, YouTube, and iTunes. To see the complete list of individual presentations on the CARTA site, go to the event page and click on the talk of interest.

Assistant/Associate Professor in Evolution & Medicine

Assistant/Associate Professor in Evolution & Medicine

The Center for Evolution & Medicine (CEM) and the School of Life Sciences (SOLS) at Arizona State University (ASU) invite applications for tenure-eligible faculty positions in the area of evolution and medicine. Rank and tenure status will be commensurate with experience. The anticipated start date is August 2017.
These positions are part of an institutional initiative to advance the field of evolutionary medicine. Under the direction of Randolph Nesse, the Center for Evolution & Medicine (CEM) seeks to improve human health by establishing evolutionary biology as a basic science for medicine, worldwide. In an institution that rewards transdisciplinary research, the CEM currently includes faculty from the School of Life Sciences, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, the Department of Psychology, and the School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, as well as researchers from ASU’s Complex Adaptive Systems Initiative and clinical partnerships with the Mayo Clinic and Banner Hospitals. For more information on the CEM, please visit
http://evmed.asu.edu/associate-assistant-professor-evolution-medicine